Making it easy to find products to meet specific dietary and personal needs.

What can I eat if I can't eat wheat?

What can I eat if I can't eat wheat?
  • Wheat Free

Our Food and Wheat 
From the basic pasta and bread to salad dressings, sauces, soups and even spices, wheat forms the base ingredient or at least one of the many ingredients in a majority of products you might pick up. 

To replace an ingredient that is so common and which acts as a base for a countless number of commercial and homemade food products is quite a gigantic task. Nevertheless, owing to the widespread incidence of wheat intolerance, the substitutes to wheat are becoming increasingly available. 

For example, if you are looking for a substitute for wheat in your baked products, you can use oat flour as the base, which will produce moist but heavy baked products. 

In the following section, we will give you a detailed list of the top wheat alternatives you can use along with 
a few examples of how you can use some of them. 

Table Top Wheat Alternatives 

Below gives a list of some of the most common alternatives to wheat. 

Amaranth (cereal) - Rice (flour) - Hazelnut (meal and flour) - Rye (flour) - Tapioca (starch flour)- Quinoa (flour) - Kamut (grains, flakes and flour) - Flaxseed (meal) - Soy (flour) - Water chestnut (flour) - Buckwheat (cereal, flour) - Sorghum (flour) - Cassava (flour) - Pearled millet (flour) - Teff (flour) - Kuzu (starch) - Barley (flour) - Chickpea (flour) - Spelt (flour) - True yam (flour) - Malanga (flour) - Millet (whole grain/ flour) - Chestnut (flour) - Poi (dehydrated starch/flour) - Lotus (flour) 
 
The Top 10 Wheat-Free Foods 
This section gives you a clearer insight into the optimum usage of the top 10 wheat-free foods that can be imbibed into your daily dietary habits. 

Rice - This is the most common alternative to wheat, jasmine and basmati rice are probably the most common and easy to access in the shops. Being a good thickener, in the form of flour, it can easily be used to make breads and muffins. 

Quinoa - This grain is very easy to digest and has high levels of calcium, phosphorous, iron, fibre, complex carbohydrates and proteins. It is considered to be an ideal additive for enhancing the nutritional value of many food items. 

Sorghum - This grain is high in carbohydrates, fibre, potassium and proteins and works best when blended with other flours. 

Millet - This is a butter-coloured grain and tastes best when combined with cinnamon or sugar. 

Amaranth - This is a grain with thick consistency and is considered ideal for making stews and puddings, in addition to its used in cereals, pastas and baked goods. Tapioca starch - Having no flavour of its own, it can add a lot of chewiness to rice flour and can be a good substitute for potato starch. 

Soy flour - It adds moistness to the dough even when used in smaller quantities. Mixed with rice flour in the right proportion (1/3rd part soy flour and 2/3rd part rice flour), it works as an ideal wheat alternative even for the strongest symptoms of wheat allergy. 

Oat flour - This form of flour carries gluten but can work well as a wheat substitute in muffins and quick 
breads. 

Buckwheat - Though not a form of wheat, yet it works well as a healthy wheat substitute. 

Rye flour - This form of flour also carries gluten but can work well as a wheat substitute. 

Read more Wheat Free articles

Source Wheat Free recipes

Search our pantries for Wheat Free Products

 

What Can I Eat Bookshop

Blog Topics